Terrence Howard

TERRENCE HOWARD


Born on March 11, 1969 in Chicago, Terrence Howard wanted to be an actor from an early age. At sixteen, he moved to New York City to attend college and to pursue his dream of landing on the silver screen.

Terrence attended Pratt University and started acting in a series of small TV roles. In 1995, he began landing major roles in Dead Presidents and Mr. Holland’s Opus. Terrence’s star continued to rise, and in 2005 he received nominations from The Screen Actors Guild and The Golden Globes for his role in Hustle and Flow. Today, he is a household name known especially for his role as “Lucious Lyon” on HBO’s hit show Empire.

Nowadays, Terrence is also known for his fight against colon cancer.  His mother died tragically of the disease at the young age of 56, in 2008. Terrence attributes his success in acting to the determination she taught him, and he reports that her death has left a void in his life. “I miss her voice and her gentle kindness”.

Terrence admits that had her cancer been detected earlier, she might be alive today.  By the time she was diagnosed at age 50, the cancer was already at stage 3. She then battled the disease for six years until her untimely death at age 56. Terrence stresses that with proper screening, her death could have been prevented. That’s why he works so hard to advocate for regular colon cancer screening, especially for high risk groups such as African-Americans or those with a family history of the disease.

Today, Terrence honors his mother’s death by helping to fight this disease in her name. He knows she would be proud of his efforts to save the lives of others. By volunteering with The Colon Cancer Alliance, he is spreading the critical message that screening and early detection can defeat colon cancer.

Colon cancer claims the lives of over 50,000 American men and women each year. It is most often found in those over 50, but many groups are at an even higher risk. However, routine screening can prevent this terrible disease. Call your doctor today to ask if you should be screened for colon cancer. It could be the most important phone call of your life.